Entries Tagged as 'vSphere'

Recommended BIOS Settings on HP

HP Power Profile Custom Allows to enable custom Power settings specific for vSphere
HP Power Regulator OS Control Mode Hands over the Power Management to vSphere. The other options give this control to the server itself.
Redundant Power Supply Mode High Efficiency Mode (Auto) By default (Balanced Mode), the server uses all installed PSU’s. This might look like the most efficient use, but the more power is drawn from a PSU, the more efficient it operates. The less power you draw from a PSU, the more gets lost to keep the PSU working. Thus, it is best to use the minimum amount of PSU’s so they deliver the highest possible output. The remaining PSU’s are placed in standby. This settings does not affect redundancy as the standby PSU’s jump in as soon as an active one fails. By using the ‘Auto’ mode, the active PSU’s are chosen based on the server’s serial number (odd or even number = odd or even PSU numbers). This makes sure that all power circuits in the racks are evenly used.
Minimum Processor Idle Power State C3 State Needed for vSphere Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS). Allows vSphere to halt unneeded cores.
DIMM Idle Power Saving Mode Enabled DIMMs can put themselves into Low Power mode when not used. This will save some power if not all memory is used on the host.
ASR Status Disabled ASR monitors an agent running in the Service Console. When this does not respond within 10 minutes, the host is rebooted. However, if the agent fails or the Service Console becomes sluggish (even though the VM’s are perfectly fine), ASR will detect this as a system hang and will reboot the server. Furthermore, in case of a PSOD, ASR will reboot the server as well. This reboot might cause a loss of some logfiles.
Automatic Power-On Disabled If set to enabled, the server will power-on as soon as AC Power is available. When set to disabled, power is restored to its previous state when AC Power is available.
Virtual Install Disk Disabled This Virtual Install Disk only contains drivers for Microsoft Windows Operating system.

How do I know if VAAI is enabled on ESX/ESXi?

To determine if VAAI is enabled within ESX/ESXi:

  • In the vSphere Client inventory panel, select the host.
  • Click the Configuration tab, and click Advanced Settings under Software.
  • Check that these options are set to 1 (enabled):


Note: These options are enabled by default.

To determine if VAAI is enabled service console in ESX or the RCLI in ESXi, run the following commands and ensure that the value is 1:

# esxcfg-advcfg -g /DataMover/HardwareAcceleratedMove
# esxcfg-advcfg -g /DataMover/HardwareAcceleratedInit
# esxcfg-advcfg -g /VMFS3/HardwareAcceleratedLocking

Can I check the VAAI status from the command line?
To check VAAI status, run the command:

# esxcfg-scsidevs -l | egrep “Display Name:|VAAI Status:”

EVA VAAI compliant?

Question that are thrown to me are:

Is the EVA VAAI compliant?
The EVA will be “vStorage APIs for Array Integration” (in short VAAI) compliant. It is NOT compliant at the moment.

Will it be in the next firmware release. Probably NOT.

The next… Probably YES. So we will have to wait, but until then the EVA should be fast enough by it’s own.

More information when available.

A “Poor man’s SAN” for ESX vSphere with VSA

Just thinking on how to make a “Poor man’s SAN” I came across this this idear:

Take 2 servers with enough disk space available and the ability to expand when needed. Install on both systems ESXi vSphere. With this installed, create on your ESX hosts VM’s with the VSA you can buy from HP.
The VSA is the same software that is running on the P4000 from HP, but now running inside your vSphere environment. The licenses go up to 10TB.
Doing so on both ESX hosts you can setup you SAN/iQ management environment and also your (first) cluster.

Make sure you have enough managers running to keep your data available in case one of your ESX hosts dies.

Now you have created your own iSCSI “P4000” like SAN. You can now connect to it from your production ESX vSphere environment.

One thing. Support from HP is NOT included.
(drawing will follow)

VAAI support with SAN/iQ 9.0 on P4000

SAN/iQ vor P4000 has now support fot VMware VAAI vStorage offloads — Full copy, Block Zeroing, and Hardware Assisted Locking for faster VM deployment and less load on ESX server.

Meaning more VM’s can be run on the same environment. Till SAN/iQ 8.1 is was recommended to a total of 16 VM’s, now up t 50 VM’s should be supported. I have not been able to test this theorie, but this is stated by HP at this moment.

To upgrade to SAN/iQ 9.0 your system should run SAN/iQ 8.1.

SQL on vSphere link collection

VMware released some whitepapers about running MS SQL Server on VMware vSphere.

The VMware communities site has a spot called VIOPS where you can see posts from members in the community about recently posted documents. There are some nice documents available about virtualizing SQL server 2008 on vSphere 4.1.

There are a couple on SQL Server, for each product a “best practices document” and an “availability and recovery options” document.

Microsoft SQL Server on VMware – Best Practices Guide

Microsoft SQL Server on VMware – Availability and Recovery Options

Performance and Scalability of Microsoft® SQL Server® on VMware vSphere™ 4

Design, Deploy & Optimize SQL Server on vSphere